QUESTION BEHIND THE QUESTION BOOK

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The Question Behind the Question: Practicing Personal Accountability in Work and in Life Audio CD – Audiobook, CD, Unabridged. Workbook: A Hands-on Tool for Practicing Personal Accountability at Work and in Life by John G. Miller Paperback $ John G. Miller is the founder of. Only by being able to ask this "question behind the question" can we take ownership of the problem and start working toward a solution. Throughout the book. The lack of personal accountability is a problem that has resulted in an earn your way to a free book! The Question Behind the Question by John G. Miller.


Question Behind The Question Book

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Earlier this year some fellow business coaches and I agreed to each identify five or six non-fiction books that are our "go to's" when we work. QBQ! The Question Behind the Question book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The lack of personal accountability is a pro . QBQ! The Question Behind the Question. The book that started it all—over one million copies in print! Enjoy this minute chat on QBQ! with Dave Ramsey and .

They'll say things like, "I have to" or "I can't. Realizing this and taking responsibility for our choices is a big step toward making great things happen in our lives. Here are the three simple guidelines for creating a QBQ.

QBQs: 1.

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When we ask "When," for example, we're really saying we have no choice but to wait and put off action until another time. Questions that start with "When" lead to procrastination.

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Procrastination is a sneaky problem. We put off a problem until a little later, and then a little later, and then a little later, until before we know it we have put off action so long that we have a serious problem. Miller quotes a friend who likes to say: "Let's take care of the little things while they're still little. We're looking for scapegoats and someone else to blame. Personal accountability is about each of us holding ourselves accountable for our own thinking and behaviors and the results they produce.

Blame and "whodunit" questions solve nothing.

They create fear, destroy creativity and build walls. There's not a chance we'll reach our full potential until we stop blaming each other and start practicing personal accountability. No matter what we're trying to accomplish, there's always a barrier of some kind to overcome, and it's often something over which we have no control.

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Instead of focusing on the barriers, let's work to become so good that we'll succeed no matter what. Who do accountable people blame? No one, not even themselves.

To make a QBQ action-focused, we add verbs such as "do," "make," "achieve," and "build" to questions that start with "What" or "How" and contain an "I. Even though there are risks involved in taking action, the alternative, inaction, is almost never the better choice. Miller writes that: Action, even when it leads to mistakes, brings learning and growth.

The Question Behind The Question

Inaction brings stagnation and atrophy. Action leads us toward solutions. Inaction at best does nothing and holds us in the past. John G. Miller's handbook aims to help eliminate blame, complaining, and procrastination and addresses what he feels is a major issue: In one form or another, we often hear these questions and statements.

Why does it seem, Miller asks, that the only thing people know how to do anymore is point the finger elsewhere, blaming something or someone else for their problems, their actions, or their feelings? It is understandable that we think and feel the way we do, especially when we get frustrated.

But the above exclamations are all negative and don't solve any problems. Say them aloud. How do they make you feel? I don't want to be a victim.

I want to have influence and a say in my circumstances. Many of the organizations that I see today reflect our society's tendency to blame other people, act like a victim, and generally not take responsibility for our own actions. QBQ is a tool that helps individuals practice personal accountability by asking better questions. The idea that we are accountable for our own choices and are free to make better ones is fundamental to the QBQ.

QBQ! The Question Behind the Question: Practicing Personal Accountability in Work and in Life

Miller writes that "Sometimes people think they have no choice. They'll say things like, "I have to" or "I can't. Realizing this and taking responsibility for our choices is a big step toward making great things happen in our lives.

Let's review the tool that Miller believes brings personal accountability to life: Here are the three simple guidelines for creating a QBQ.

When we ask "When," for example, we're really saying we have no choice but to wait and put off action until another time. Questions that start with "When" lead to procrastination. Procrastination is a sneaky problem.

We put off a problem until a little later, and then a little later, and then a little later, until before we know it we have put off action so long that we have a serious problem. Miller quotes a friend who likes to say: We're looking for scapegoats and someone else to blame.

Personal accountability is about each of us holding ourselves accountable for our own thinking and behaviors and the results they produce.

Blame and "whodunit" questions solve nothing. They create fear, destroy creativity and build walls. There's not a chance we'll reach our full potential until we stop blaming each other and start practicing personal accountability. No matter what we're trying to accomplish, there's always a barrier of some kind to overcome, and it's often something over which we have no control.

Instead of focusing on the barriers, let's work to become so good that we'll succeed no matter what. Who do accountable people blame? No one, not even themselves.Glance through our more than 55 and growing book summaries!

By John G. Find your local bookstore at booksellers. Inaction often indicates fear. Hi-Res Cover. Miller - Personal Improvement - News: Let's review the tool that Miller believes brings personal accountability to life: