STEVE WAUGH AUTOBIOGRAPHY PDF

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Autobiography of cricketer Steve Waugh. The book includes color and b& w photos and extensive details of his best matches including the Ashes. A short extract from a chapter in Steve Waugh's autobiography for the purposes of discussion on the topic of Download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd. Rarely does a truly great player reveal as much of himself and his sport as does Steve Waugh in his long awaited autobiography. "Out of my Comfort Zone" is a.


Steve Waugh Autobiography Pdf

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One Who Will The Search For Steve Waugh authored by Jack Egan. A gift for the Cricket fans. Visit the following link to read online or download the book in Pdf. File Name: Steve Waugh Out Of My Comfort Zone The Autobiography Total Downloads: Formats: djvu | pdf | epub | site. Rated: /10 (50 votes). Steve Waugh's persona on the cricket field was best summed up by the name Pdf Book Chemystery Kid Zone Download Author: eBook.

Steve Waugh is closest to what I have as an idol. My interest in cricket grew with Waugh's career and is now in a semi-retired state. Out of my comfort zone is a well chronicled autobiography from the iceman. Having youtube is a big help. I was able to search and play back some of the interesting moments that Waugh recollects. This is a treasure trove for any cricket enthusiast.

Jul 15, Kiki rated it it was amazing. I enjoyed this immensely and it called for a 5 star for that reason only, I freely admit I'm extremely biased. An amazing book is what this is.

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Steve Waugh opens up about everything that a cricket lover would look forward to. He talks at length even about the smallest of things like taking guard before batting or what goes on in a fielder's mind just before a catch is taken.

The best thing about this book is how it brings forth how Steve is just a human after all. It talks about his ambitions, expectations from himself and others and his struggle throughout his playing period.

It's a wonderful ride to re An amazing book is what this is. It's a wonderful ride to read about the joy on being picked in a team to the frustration of getting out in the 90s to the disappointment of being dropped from a team. He has revealed the discussions in the team meetings, the wild celebrations after wins, the sadness lurking around after losses, how he bent the team rules as a youngster, his tiffs with his teammates and the opposition, the changing dynamics of the Australian team while it underwent changes in terms of coaches and the bickering with the cricket board while the players formed their association.

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Even the parts about his life outside cricket, like his association with Udayan, the relationship with his family and his excursions on different countries, are very impressive. As a Mark Waugh fan, I looked forward to what Steve had to say about the apparent lack of conversations between them and I wasn't disappointed. As a writer, Steve is exceptionally good.

I especially loved the metaphors sprinkled throughout the text. The book is a must read for anybody who followed cricket in the 90s. The afterword written by Lynette Steve's wife is not to be missed. It's so nice to see Steve write throughout about her as the main supporting force behind his successes while she talks everything down as being "just an ordinary person who did what had to be done".

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Nov 16, Amanda Patterson rated it did not like it. Waugh writes like he batted.

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He assumes that the writer who accumulates the most pages wins. He is not a skilled author and one doubts whether an editor was allowed anywhere near this tome. This cumbersome book is pages long. It shows a boring, self-obsessed man pouring out his long-winded strangled attempts at description on many many pages.

Its interesting to note Waugh writes like he batted. Waugh glosses over important cricketing events, always managing to reveal how he was the star of the show and always right, to boot - and how everyone else was either unimportant or wrong.

The sad truth is that he gets close to revealing the true sportsman and then cops out — time and time again. For someone who admits to bottling up his emotions he sure managed to bring up a lot of empty ones on this word publication.

Waugh was a great cricketer but this autobiography fails to inspire. Great for a doorstop Nov 30, Amith Guthi rated it really liked it. I'd say - a lot! Steve Waugh to me was the model cricketer.

Tough, relentless and committed to the teams objective. He was not as graceful as his brother or Brian Lara, he was not as much fun as Shane Warne was or Kevin Pietersen is, he was far from being as entertaining as Gilchrist is but even after all these 'deficiencies' he to my eyes wa so, what can you learn from Australian Cricket team's most successful captain?

He was not as graceful as his brother or Brian Lara, he was not as much fun as Shane Warne was or Kevin Pietersen is, he was far from being as entertaining as Gilchrist is but even after all these 'deficiencies' he to my eyes was one of the 10 best players to ever play the sport.

It is a very honest portrayal of everything Steve would go through from his humble beginnings to the pinnacle of his career, i. Nov 14, Abdullah Farooki rated it really liked it Shelves: For a man who remained aloof and emotionally detached, the book does give a lot of insight behind the thinking process that went about playing his game and his captaincy. It was really hard to put the book down for even a minute! Very entertaining and insightful!

Like his cricket - not very attractive, but very effective and educational about the man and the sport. Jul 19, Aseem Deshpande rated it it was ok.

Not the best book in the family, either. Oct 08, Tony rated it really liked it. I decided to reread this book and as it is about pages long that decision was not taken lightly. First of all it s a cricket book, an Australian cricket book which is almost encyclopaedic in nature.

There are some fascinating parts and parts of cricket history which are laid out bare. Being a Steve Waugh fan, I really enjoyed it but I could understand if someone else described it as tedious. All up it is a very well written and interesting book which all Australian cricket nuts would love to I decided to reread this book and as it is about pages long that decision was not taken lightly.

All up it is a very well written and interesting book which all Australian cricket nuts would love to read. Nov 05, Ashutosh Dikshit rated it really liked it.

A very well written magnum opus, which encapsulates all that is good about Steve Waugh, a modern batting legend. Dec 03, Nitin Jagtap rated it really liked it. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Steve 'Tugga' Waugh or Iceman Steve as he was popularly known never had the talent of a Tendulkar or the Charisma of Shane Warne nor was he intimidating on the field like McGrath nor was he as flamboyant as Jayasuriya but if you look into what he has achieved in his nearly 20 years of cricket you will easily acknowledge Steve as one of the greatest to have played the game, his sheer grit, discipline and never say die attitude is something cricket fans will speak for generations.

This book is qui Steve 'Tugga' Waugh or Iceman Steve as he was popularly known never had the talent of a Tendulkar or the Charisma of Shane Warne nor was he intimidating on the field like McGrath nor was he as flamboyant as Jayasuriya but if you look into what he has achieved in his nearly 20 years of cricket you will easily acknowledge Steve as one of the greatest to have played the game, his sheer grit, discipline and never say die attitude is something cricket fans will speak for generations.

This book is quite detailed I would say really detailed and is spread over pages but still worth a look for anybody having interest not only in cricket but in general about sports leadership and management. I can only imagine what it means to win the Ashes for the Aussies or the English only after reading this book, the intensity in which the Ashes are played seem to be much more than a typical India VS Pakistan match.

Many epic test matches and incidents over the 80S , 90s and 00S take you back down memory lane, most notable amongst them are the Chennai test against India which ended in a tie, the Trinidad and Tobago test against the windies and the famous face off he had with Ambrose, the Eden Gardens test against India which saw the heroic innings from VVS and Dravid, the Adelaide test which again saw VVS and Dravid get the better of the Aussies and the infamous incident involving McGrath and Sarwan.

Steve has also shared some memorable moments in the book, insights into Australian Cricket culture, the loneliness of being a captain, the highs and lows associated with the success and failures of your team, winning the prestigious Laureus award , playing the Ashes, the Frank Worrell Trophy version of Ashes aginst the Windies , his association with Udayan a NGO based out of Kolkatta and his love for India initially it was love to hate , his first meeting with Mother Teresa , the bribing and match fixing controversies that rocked the cricketing world which involved senior layers from India, Pakistan , Australia and South Africa.

The resurrection of Australian cricket under John Buchanan and Waugh himself is something worth going through, it offers lots of life lessons, be it on team play, strategy, planning fitness and discipline something that the previous generation of Aussie cricketers had not taken very seriously. Some nice little superstitions which cricketers follow, Steve himself had this red handkerchief which he always carried with him while playing right from the days he started playing for Australia in mid 80s till the day he retired, he was so particular about it that in one of Ashes tour in England he had forgotten it back home and was going through a rough patch on the field, he immediately asked for this hankie to be couriered to him to England.

If you want to know the life story of an inspiring sportsman and what it takes to become one, do read this book. Mar 13, Mudit Sood rated it really liked it. The Australian cricketer Steve Waugh started his career as a bowler who could also bat at the lower middle order. Contrary to the 'stone cold' image in the public, he often struggled with his mind doubting his own capabilities in the game. He battled through his negative thoughts in his career to emerge out as one of the greatest cricketers of all time and also one of the most successful Australian batsman and captain.

The first time I held this book in my hands it sent goosebumps down my body. I The Australian cricketer Steve Waugh started his career as a bowler who could also bat at the lower middle order. I could feel this enormous pages strong volume breathing of life in my hands just like a horcrux would do.

The book is so carefully crafted right from the outer cover to the magnificently easy to comprehend language and the pictures taken out of Steve's personal tour albums throughout the world. It had a very distinct personal touch to it, the kind which establishes a direct contact between the reader and the legend himself. The book starts off with an 'explosive' foreword written by batting maestro Rahul Dravid, followed by one written by Steve's friend Tim May.

It takes you through his childhood, the formative years of his cricketing career, the breakthrough, the two decades of Aussie cricket, his struggles with himself, his long struggles with the Australian cricketing body, his view about different countries, sledging, the different events in the cricketing world which took place during his career, his philosophies about life in general and most importantly you'll get to witness first hand from Waugh himself - the transformation of the Australian cricket team which was in disarray in the middle of the 80s before the world cup under the leadership of Allan Border to becoming the best cricketing side in the early s under his own leadership..

The entire book was peppered with happenings from his personal life marriage, kids etc. Many people in India have criticized this book for being too harsh in his comments about the living conditions and the poverty of the country. I believe he gave an honest picture of the country.

Imagine a young guy who lived his entire life in a highly developed country like Australia coming out and playing in a developing country like India. He'll definitely witness massive changes in his surroundings and this is what he has portrayed in the book. He doesn't criticize the country, he just gives a first hand account of what the country looked like to him when he stayed there for the first few times. And I believe most of us Indians would agree with his views.

It's just that we're either too embarrassed to accept it or we're too ignorant about the realities of our country. On the brighter side, reading about his work for Udayan in Kolkata was very heart touching. I really enjoyed reading this book. The detailed tour analysis and the tid-bits the other side of the cricket away from the field taken out of the countless tour diaries maintained by Steve Waugh throughout his career makes this book which dwarfs the Oxford dictionary in size an engaging read.

It'll give a cricket enthusiast a word by word 'visual' of almost 20 years of pure Australian cricket.

Death by Silence_Out of My Comfort Zone_Steve Waugh

A must read! Link to my blog: Sep 22, Kristian Brockmann rated it really liked it. A truly tremendous sporting account and one of the greatest accompaniments to summer that a sports fan could discover. Revealing, yes, insightful too, and Steve tells some hidden tales on leading Australia's greats in a game at times tough and always testing. From Border's days and the Chappel era we could all associate with days long and hot in the backyard and the awesome climb to the pinnacle of a baggy green cap and representing our nation.

Most impressive though were the thoughtful moments A truly tremendous sporting account and one of the greatest accompaniments to summer that a sports fan could discover. Most impressive though were the thoughtful moments where Stephen was inspiring the team with music, team huddles and tips on gameplay, which although seemingly incongruous evolved into his record as Australian cricket's most successful captain. The glory of a century at the crease gained some appreciation and an understanding of the achievement, developing over a long career.

With a test cricketer's glory were invoked memories of days of cricket for Sydney, a premiership and days with mates in Meadowbank inspired by Australia's best. And yet, through all of the honours of cricket, the times are told of a down to earth Aussie bloke with an everyday life and a real gem of an innings.

His family with his brothers, folks, partner and children are the most important through it all. He's known too for being an all-rounder and with twin brilliance with Mark Waugh and their individual selections to Australia. I could really appreciate the celebrations with Southern Comfort, as it's a favourite, and developed a sympathy for the times he found with Lynette, a high school girlfriend, whilst managing the responsibilities of the sport.

Their times together are treasured through marriage and family and the reader can understand his true character through an epilogue by Lynette and his revelations throughout the biography of what is a private life too. When he writes, which seems fairly often, he writes well.

A really easy to read story on a favourite topic and well recommended. Great for those who love the game and certainly worthy of a tremendous cheer from an avid reader.

Bravo Stephen Waugh. Out of my Comfort Zone was one of the most relevant books I've discovered.

And thank you, marvellous effort that! Nov 05, Mayank rated it really liked it. This is a Cricketing biography in its truest sense and Steve Waugh talks about his struggles through injury and form issues and admits some of his fears. His experiences through India with the Udayan initiative and the other parts of the world, his confrontation with the board and absolute transformation to being 'The Invincibles' are engaging read. He uses clever and very subtle humor when talking about cricketing A stalwart, Steve Waugh epitomizes Aussie and the much revered Baggy Green spirit.

He uses clever and very subtle humor when talking about cricketing issues and also when talking about some of his peers and team mates. It is amazing that he cracks the greatest cricketing code with the simplest of formula: Work ethic and attitude and these define Steve Waugh. What is really missed in the book is his equation with his brothers and specially his twin. In fact, the book very briefly brings the contrast in the two and also talks about the assumed sibling rivalry during childhood days.

It appears that neither of them was exactly comfortable with their identity as twins. The Waugh brothers really played a defining role in the Aussie game and it would have been great had he shared his and his brother's reaction. However, towards the end of the book you feel that the brothers were a comfortable lot and their comfort level with each other made them men of fewer words.

He brings out his equation with his partner really well and also acknowledges contribution of his team mates, friends and family in his development. The dressing room practices of the team shared in the book are an interesting read.

Like a typical Steve Waugh innings, the book gradually picks up intensity and pace and once its settles it is a lengthy stay. We expect some breakthrough theory, some innovations from him every time when he talks cricket and the man keeps it simple and engaging. Apr 25, Saravana rated it it was amazing. If you are a cricket fan,go and grab this book now or else you are not exposed completely to what cricket is all about. The book that reveals the heart of a man who was one of the architechts of the Australian success in Cricket.

Stephen Rodger Waugh is one of those very few cricketers whose life is a lesson itself He is a genius,not by birth ,but acuqired it through sheer grit,perseverence and hardwork.

The book is foreworded by our very own Rahul Dravid who sums up everything in his last few wo If you are a cricket fan,go and grab this book now or else you are not exposed completely to what cricket is all about.

The book is foreworded by our very own Rahul Dravid who sums up everything in his last few words "When I hit the winning runs in Adelaide,Steve found the ball and handed it to me.

Getting to that point had entailed putting in place a very deliberate process. It was a process that required patience, commitment and consistent application, all of which were fuelled by the desire to be the best. Waugh described the role of captain as one that required him to be an advisor, mentor, friend, psychologist, mediator, spokesperson, politician and selector.

Dexterity, flexibility and an ability to recognise what role is required are skills that are integral to savvy leadership. The normal corporate environment is a cacophony of diversity that demands of leaders the ability to respond in a variety of ways. This requires leaders to exhibit a great degree of emotional intelligence, understanding and sensitivity.

It could be an interesting exercise to make a list of the various roles you as a leader have been required to play over the past four months and then to examine your performance as you have done so. Valuable questions then include: Which roles require further development? Which are the roles that energize and which have been the ones that have drained energy? What roles are needed, but are missing? Here then are lessons that savvy leaders can take from the Steve Waugh story: Create a healthy work environment.

Creating a healthy work environment is not something that can be achieved overnight. It requires consistency and a clear picture of the environment that one is trying to create.

Working off clearly articulated values is one way to guide the creation of an environment that will reflect such ideals. Often companies succeed in articulating the values only to fail in the follow through of then building an environment that embodies those values. That failure becomes the breeding ground for cynicism, bad morale and a lack of motivation. Waugh constantly sought to challenge, stimulate and provoke those around him to ensure the creation of a healthy work environment.

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As most leaders can attest too, at times this can be a thankless task! When it comes to bricks and mortar, Googleplex, the colourful Silicon Valley corporate head office of Google, where staff can receive a daily free massage stands as a testimony to what a healthy work environment looks like.

Sergey Brin and Larry Page spared no expense in building a place people wanted to be and an environment that catered for almost their every need.

Of course, a healthy work environment extends beyond the bricks and mortar, but that might not be a bad place to start in order to show some sort of intent in the quest to breed a winning culture! Respect the past but initiate new processes. As an Australian cricketer and captain, Waugh was very conscious of being part of something bigger. He sought to honour the past and its traditions without becoming ensnared by the same.

For Waugh, the cap symbolized all that Australian cricket stood for and represented.

Waugh introduced the idea of former players presenting the cap to debutants which was a deliberate attempt to link the present with the past and draw inspiration from that which had gone before. Somehow Waugh seemed to manage the tension between respecting the past yet introducing new initiatives.

It is a balance leaders would do well to replicate. The challenge of course being that there can be no formula to follow: each has to discover and navigate their own path in attempting this balance. Empower those around you. Waugh regarded a major part of his captaincy role to be the empowerment his players by re-enforcing positive messages and providing opportunities.

This is an obvious strategy but there is an important precursor to such a strategy, namely, getting to know those around you first.

Knowing the strengths, weaknesses, values and viewpoints of those around you are important if appropriate opportunities are to be created. He believed that faith and support was all that a talented individual needed within a team environment and took any opportunity to praise his players.

Re-enforce positive messages and providing opportunities builds confidence — a vital ingredient for any sportsperson. Waugh believed that as captain he could make things happen if he instilled belief and planted seeds of hope in those he led.

Why would it be any different in a corporate environment? Be flexible and embrace variety.

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In other words, get everyone out of the comfort zone. He describes how the responsibility of leadership consistently challenged his personal comfort zones as he was required to perform roles to which he was unaccustomed. For any leader, the obvious result of a willingness to embrace flexibility and variety, is personal growth. For the company as a whole, the ability to be flexible is a critical determining factor in building and sustaining success.

Learning companies are those where the need to be flexible is taken as a given. Commitment and accountability are non-negotiable. Waugh firmly believed that assuming personal and collective responsibility led to success. Waugh believed that a successful team was one whose collective will could manipulate the critical moments in their favour by never giving up.

The evidence of this has become a hallmark of Australian cricket sides that can never be written off no matter how dire the situation in which they find themselves.

Out of my Comfort Zone: The Autobiography

Deal with the issues before they become major problems. Waugh came to understand that dealing with issues not directly related to the team but which could impact the team was part of his job. He found that on being elevated to the captaincy he was suddenly expected to know something about everything, almost as if his intelligence had all of a sudden increased with his stature. In the complexity of the role that Waugh found himself in he quickly realised that it was better to deal with issues early, before they became major headaches.

In other words, deal with problems before they become endemic. In leadership this is sound advice especially for those who are prone to procrastination. However there is a caution to be sounded at this point. When one is aware of the value of process and allowing others to assume responsibility, such an approach has merit. The trick for leaders is to know which approach to adopt and why it is they are following that particular tack.

In many executive and management teams, problems that drain energy and absorb valuable resources can be traced to situations that could have, should have, been nipped in the bud. Honesty and consistency go a long way to ensuring credibility if you are to deal with issues as they emerge.

Of course there is also the need for the leader to accept that if you are to use such an approach with others, then it needs to be applicable both ways. Or to put it another way: Inherent in the leader dealing early with the issues that arise, is a tacit invitation to reciprocity.

Praise in public and criticize in private. There are some who believe that a public dressing down can spur motivation and get results. On occasion they may be right but it is at best a high-risk approach and the danger of losing respect and trust obvious.

Treat everyone equally but differently. Herein sits the true genius of the Savvy leader. Savvy leaders in a Connection economy recognise that they are required to adopt a variety of approaches in order to effectively lead others.

Waugh understood this principle and worked hard to understand what he needed to be and do in order to get the best out of those around him. Getting this balance right will require a thoughtful and deliberate effort on the part of the leader. Perhaps a helpful template to better understand this can be taken from the world of parenting. Parents who have more than one child understand the need to take different approaches to a range of issues from discipline to motivation with their children.

Whilst the children are loved and valued equally, the differing approaches are designed to recognise and celebrate the unique personality of each child.Friend Reviews. Any chance of a balanced account of events was scuttled by the ACB gagging players and management from making any comment, and death by silence was our sentence. But, ultimately, somebody has to take a stand, because this sort of thing has been going on for too long.

No trivia or quizzes yet. It is a very honest portrayal of everything Steve would go through from his humble beginnings to the pinnacle of his career, i. I enjoyed this immensely and it called for a 5 star for that reason only, I freely admit I'm extremely biased. The writer might have left his comfort zone, but did he have to try taking the reader with him? Nayuki Hara. In this statistically-minded age, it is the dimensions of Steve Waugh's autobiography that first command attention.